Super Pinstripe Project



The Pinstripe is a dominant morph, not a co-dominant, because it does not have a super form, that looks different than the regular Pinstripe.

To be more specific, to get a Pinstripe, the pinstripe gene must be passed down from either the sire or the dame. In theory, if BOTH, the sire and dame, pass the pinstripe gene, there should be a super pinstripe. To this day, people have tried, and there has never been a pinstripe to pinstripe mating that has produced anything looking different from the pinstripe or the normal. I.E. No visible supers have ever been seen.

This implies either 1) The super form looks just like the standard pinstripe, or 2) there is absolutely no such thing as a super pinstripe, which could only happen if somehow a female follicles, if possessing the pinstripe gene, can somehow reject any male sperm containing the same gene.

I personally do not see how option 2 is possible, but I’m no geneticist. Therefore, I am going with the assumption, that the super form of the pinstripe looks just like the normal pinstripe, but nobody has taken the time needed to prove one out.

I cannot say “nobody”. I keep hearing rumors of some breeder that has a genetic super pinstripe (still not a visual difference from the regular pinstripe.)

All that said, this year (2012) I paired a male Pinstripe to a female Pinstripe, and produced 3 pinstripe looking hatchlings. Of these, two are male, and one is female.

The rest of this project will take place in the years to come. When these hatchlings are big enough to breed, I will be watching for one or more of them to pass the pinstripe gene to 100% of their offspring. This is going to be difficult to prove, but if a single offspring does NOT receive the pinstripe gene, it will disqualify it’s parent from further tests.

Wish me luck!

Super Pinstripe Project was last modified: January 2nd, 2015 by Tom
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10 Responses to Super Pinstripe Project

  1. Junior Rohl says:

    Any positive findings?

  2. Alice says:

    This made me think; working with dominant genes is really the inverse process of working with recessives.
    With dominant gene pairings you get visual forms that are 33% super (in theory one out of 3 visual pinstripes in a pin(het) x pin(het) clutch is super)..
    whereas with het for recessive pairings, you get non-visuals that are 66% het for the recessive gene (33% normal).. ;)
    Cool stuff!

  3. Alice says:

    This made me think; working with dominant genes is really the inverse process of working with recessives.
    With one you get visual forms that are 33% super (in theory one out of 3 visual pinstripes in a pin(het) x pin(het) clutch is super)..
    whereas with a het for recessive pairing, you get non-visuals that are 66% het for the recessive gene (33% normal).. ;)
    Cool stuff!

  4. Evan Stahl says:

    I have proved out the super pinstripe. I have now produced over 60 babies from all non pinstripe morph females, bred by my male pastel butter pinstripe who was from a pastel butter pinstripe x lemon blast breeding. With 8 clutches from 8 different females over 2 years and every single baby is a pinstripe I think that has been strong statistical evidence of the super.

    • Thomas says:

      With 60 babies, I believe that is 1 chance in 2 to the 60th power (something like 115 with 16 more digits behind it, or 1:1.15 quintillion)… Anyway, astronomical odds of getting all pinstripes, if the male was not a super form of the pinstripe.

      Congrats!

  5. Alex says:

    Sorry to hear one passed.I think some of the Pinstripes from a Pinstripe x Pinstripe pairing will be considered super pinstripes no visual difference but will produce all Pinstripes even bred to a normal.Please let us know if you have any that look slightly different i have heard some may have a slight barley noticeable difference in pattern width.

    • Thomas says:

      That is my belief as well, that the super form is possible, but looks no different than the standard pinstripe.

  6. stephen says:

    How did the super pinstripe project turn out?

    • Thomas says:

      Unfortunately, our male (named “Pinhead”) was not quite mature enough this last season, and did not link with anyone. He is now over 800 grams, and I hope to try again this fall.

      Our female, “Peaches”, is just a tad larger, and will require at least one more year of growth.

      There was a third hatchling, (another male) but he died just after his first meal.

      If neither of these possible supers prove out, it still would not disprove the theory. I have heard of others (maybe Outback Reptiles?) that has/had a male that has sired something like 50 pinstripes, with no normals. I have not followed up with inquiries. If you do find out more, can you let us know?

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